Among Us has become a wildly popular game seemingly overnight. One of the big upsides to the game is the sheer number of ways to play, but as a result it can be hard to know what kind of way you want to play. Let’s take a look at the settings and which ones you might be interested in using for your Among Us playgroup.

Among Us settings and modifiers

So there are quite a few settings to look into. The available modifiers are:

  • Map
  • # Imposters
  • Confirm Ejects
  • # Emergency Meetings
  • Emergency Cooldown
  • Discussion Time
  • Voting Time
  • Player Speed
  • Crewmate Vision
  • Imposter Vision
  • Kill Cooldown
  • Kill Distance
  • Visual Tasks
  • # Common Tasks
  • # Long Tasks
  • # Short Tasks

Most of them are pretty self-explanatory, the map setting lets you choose which map to play on for instance. Likewise, many settings can be changed one way or the other without seriously impacting the style of play. Just because someone uses a specific set of modifiers doesn’t mean that those settings are best for you and your playgroup.

Additionally, all these settings are for games with 10 players and 2 impostors. If you play with a different configuration, then be sure to adjust them as needed.

Among Us, what vision settings to use

Vision settings are going to be the modifiers that have some of the biggest impacts on how your game plays. In general, you want the imposters to have a bigger vision radius than the crewmembers. This allows them to stalk crewmembers and have a bigger awareness of their surroundings than the crew, while the crew has a slightly harder game.

But that difficulty is part of the fun. It wouldn’t be a fun game if the crew could see everything, they’d always be able to identify the imposters. Popular streamers for Among Us can be frequently seen using crew vision of 0.5x and imposter vision of 1x to 1.5x. This gives the crew a small circle of awareness that makes it hard to keep track of people, while imposters can see everything.

Among Us, task settings

Tasks are the next most impactful part of how Among Us plays. The list of odd jobs the crew have to do can be tweaked to give a slight advantage to one side or the other. Tasks come in three categories, common tasks, long tasks, and short tasks, as well as a modifier for having visual tasks (more on them later) on or off.

Many streamers seem to go with one common task, two long tasks, and two short tasks, and visual tasks off. In general, more long tasks makes the game harder for crew, while short tasks tend to be a little more manageable. Common tasks, on the other hand, actually benefit the crew once you figure out what they are, because all crew members will have the same common tasks.

Visual tasks are unique in that other players can see you performing them, making them a way to guarantee that you are not an imposter. Depending on how good your players are as crew and imposter, and whether you have voice communication or not, you may want to adjust these settings. I recommend turning visual tasks off if you have voice communication in your playgroup, as the visual tasks can be too easy to abuse otherwise.

Among Us, kill settings

The third most important group of settings to consider are the various kill settings in Among Us, as these will impact how your imposters have to play. A low kill cooldown will give imposters a lot of freedom to score multiple kills in a round, while long ones can shift their focus to covering their tracks. Kill range is also something to consider, as a longer range can make it harder for crew to escape a killer with movement, while a shorter range can make imposters have to be more careful with their positioning.

Among Us Streamers generally settle on a cooldown of 22.5 seconds, a number that leaves imposters open to multiple types of gameplay without hamstringing them. For this, they also use a short kill distance, something needed for games where the crew has a short vision range.

Among Us, discussion time and miscellaneous settings

Of the other settings, the most impactful on games is the “Confirm Ejects” setting. This setting is whether or not the game informs players whether or not a voted player was indeed an impostor or not. In general, streamers play with confirmed ejects off, but inexperienced groups and pick-up groups may prefer to play with it on.

Discussion and voting time are going to be more influential on games of Among Us where players have to communicate through text instead of voice. Discussion time is simply the time where voting is locked, and voting time is the remainder. It’s customary to have a short discussion time and a long voting time for ease of use, but you’re free to experiment with different options.

If you’re playing with voice chat, consider giving players around 90 seconds of voting time and a shorter discussion time.

Another modifier to look into in Among Us is player speed. This can be an interesting thing to play with because, in theory, it benefits everyone equally. However, the faster all players move, the quicker the crew can finish their tasks, and the increased likelihood of someone stumbling into an area with a dead body.

Among Us Streamers tend to settle on default speed, but lots of groups use 1.25x speed a well. Definitely play around with speed in your groups, but don’t always assume that faster is better.

Published 16 Sep 2020, 03:13 IST